On Low Street in prime position in Banff Royal Burgh is where you’ll find our new community-led not for profit tourist office, with all of the tools visitors are looking for; brochures, maps, expert advice, and sometimes just a chat.

Our five volunteers all share a love for the area, and together we are creating walking guides, street maps, postcards, and thinking long and hard about events we can organise. 

Historic Banffshire

Historic Banffshire covered the coast from Port Gordon to Troupe Head, but not quite as far as Pennan though we’re happy to claim it; and then inland to Aberchirder, Keith, Dufftown, Tomintoul, as far as Loch Avon.

Despite the breakup of Banffshire in local government reorganisations, the connections between our towns are as strong as ever.

 

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